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[Aporte][Ingles II Industrial] Final 16-02-2012
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gonnza Sin conexión
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Ing. en Sistemas
Facultad Regional Buenos Aires

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[Aporte][Ingles II Industrial] Final 16-02-2012 Finales Inglés II
En esta fecha tomaron el siguiente texto

Cita:Crisis of development: previous attempts to better the lot of the developing world have proved deeply flawed. And the latest efforts stem more from desperation than conviction. (Straight Talk).

Today the industrialised world is embarked--half-heartedly--on yet another crusade to try to enrich the developing world. The ideology behind it is called "neoliberalism" and it has two guiding principles. The first is that close economic contact between the industrial core and the developing periphery is the best way to accelerate the transfer of technology, the sine qua non for making poor economies rich. (Hence barriers to international trade should be eliminated as fast as possible.) The second is that governments in general lack the capacity to run large industrial and commercial enterprises. (Hence, save for core missions of income distribution, public-good infrastructure, administration of justice and a few others, governments should shrink and privatise.)

This neoliberal crusade is not the first such campaign for economic development. Since World War II there have been at least six such crusades: the "building socialism" crusade, the "financing gap" crusade, the "import substitution" crusade, the "oil money recycling" crusade, the "population boom" crusade, and the "aid for education" crusade. All failed to spark rapid economic development.

Does what went wrong have any lessons about the future of the crusade we are undertaking now? Yes, and that is exactly what World Bank economist Bill Easterly has shown in his new book, The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists' Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics (MIT Press). It is Easterly's own take on the largely dismal history of government-led programmes to spark development.

These different crusades of the past overlapped in time, so there is no clear …


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28-02-2012 01:22
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gerch31 (08-08-2013)
juandelazzari Sin conexión
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Facultad Regional Buenos Aires

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Re: RE: [Aporte][Ingles II Industrial] Final 16-02-2012
(28-02-2012 01:22)gonnza escribió:  En esta fecha tomaron el siguiente texto

Cita:Crisis of development: previous attempts to better the lot of the developing world have proved deeply flawed. And the latest efforts stem more from desperation than conviction. (Straight Talk).

Today the industrialised world is embarked--half-heartedly--on yet another crusade to try to enrich the developing world. The ideology behind it is called "neoliberalism" and it has two guiding principles. The first is that close economic contact between the industrial core and the developing periphery is the best way to accelerate the transfer of technology, the sine qua non for making poor economies rich. (Hence barriers to international trade should be eliminated as fast as possible.) The second is that governments in general lack the capacity to run large industrial and commercial enterprises. (Hence, save for core missions of income distribution, public-good infrastructure, administration of justice and a few others, governments should shrink and privatise.)

This neoliberal crusade is not the first such campaign for economic development. Since World War II there have been at least six such crusades: the "building socialism" crusade, the "financing gap" crusade, the "import substitution" crusade, the "oil money recycling" crusade, the "population boom" crusade, and the "aid for education" crusade. All failed to spark rapid economic development.

Does what went wrong have any lessons about the future of the crusade we are undertaking now? Yes, and that is exactly what World Bank economist Bill Easterly has shown in his new book, The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists' Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics (MIT Press). It is Easterly's own take on the largely dismal history of government-led programmes to spark development.

These different crusades of the past overlapped in time, so there is no clear …


fuente: finalesUTN! espero les sirrrva thumbup3

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17-12-2013 23:06
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